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General Mills Recalls 15 Million More Pounds of Flour

General Mills Recalls 15 Million More Pounds of Flour



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As the E. coli outbreak expands and more people get sick, General Mills has recalled more flour

Gold Medal is one of the recalled brands.

A General Mills flour plant in Kansas City, Missouri, has seen 45 million pounds of its flour recalled for containing E. Despite this news, the plant remains open and continues to produce flour.

Thirteen of the 46 E. The recalled flour comes from General Mills’ three main brands of flour: Gold Medal, Signature Kitchens and Wondra. The further recall of flour — 15 million pounds yesterday — was spurred by the Food and Drug Administration’s discovery of a second strain of E. coli in the flour and in hospitalized victims.

Previously, General Mills announced an original recall, followed by a second one after the E. coli had been found in cake mixes.

General Mills continues to operate its plant because, according to a company spokesperson, it has not found any E. coli in the facility yet. However, the company has elevated cleaning protocols nonetheless.

For consumers, there are a couple of things you can do to make sure you don’t come down with E. Most importantly, per General Mills’ chief operating officer Jeff Harmening, is to avoid uncooked flour. All you bakers, listen up: Don’t lick the bowl!

General Mills asserts that no illnesses have been connected with properly cooked and handled flour, but the FDA is recommending not taking any chances. In a release to the public, it warned, “Consumers unaware of the recall could continue to eat these recalled flours [because of flour’s long shelf life] and potentially get sick. If consumers have any of these recalled flours in their homes, they should throw such flour products away.”

To view the complete list of recalled products, click here.


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


UPDATED: The Scary Reason You Should Check and Chuck Your Flour

In May, General Mills issued a voluntary recall of 10 million pounds of flour products due to possible E. coli contamination, and since then, the recall was expanded to include flour sold at Safeway, Albertsons, Jewel-Osco, Shaws, Vons, United, Randalls, and Acme stores. Initially, General Mills released an official press release that stated, "To date, E. coli O121 has not been found in any General Mills flour products or in the flour manufacturing facility, and the company has not been contacted directly by any consumer reporting confirmed illnesses related to these products."

The company then stated it "is expanding its recall of Gold Medal flour, Wondra flour, and Signature Kitchens flour to include flour made earlier in the fall that may still be in consumers' pantries."

It is now, however, becoming apparent that the flour recall might be worse than it had initially thought. On July 25, General Mills and the CDC announced yet another expansion of its recall due to four more people contracting E. coli — adding to the 46 cases of E. coli since the outbreak began in December. As a result, the recall will now include products made through Feb. 10, 2016.

In a press release, General Mills also advised consumers to not eat uncooked dough or batter, as it could possibly contain the contaminated flour. The announcement is further proof that we definitely shouldn't be eating raw cookie dough.

To view a complete list of possibly affected products, including Gold Medal All-Purpose Flour, see General Mills's statement. Then get rid of any affected products you have — stat!


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