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Easy Roast Turkey with No-Roux Gravy

Easy Roast Turkey with No-Roux Gravy



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It’s important to follow the measurements for the salt and to use a low-sodium stock (or, better yet, a homemade one) for this recipe—otherwise, the gravy could wind up being too salty.

Ingredients

  • 2 teaspoons dark brown sugar
  • 2 teaspoons ground fennel seeds, coriander seeds, aniseed, and/or celery seeds, or favorite spice blend (optional)
  • 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper
  • 3 tablespoons Diamond Crystal kosher salt or 4½ teaspoons Morton kosher salt, plus more
  • 1 11–13-pound turkey, neck and giblets removed and reserved, patted dry
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter, room temperature
  • 1 pound turkey or chicken wings (optional)
  • 2 large onions, unpeeled, quartered
  • 4 celery stalks, halved crosswise
  • 1 head of garlic, halved crosswise
  • 4 cups (or more) low-sodium chicken broth

Recipe Preparation

  • Mix brown sugar, spices, pepper, and 3 Tbsp. or 4 ½ tsp. salt in a small bowl to combine; sprinkle all over surface and inside cavity of turkey. Place turkey on a V-shape roasting rack set inside a large roasting pan (if using a disposable pan, place it on a rimmed baking sheet). Chill, uncovered, at least 8 hours and up to 1 day.

  • Let sit at room temperature 1½–2 hours.

  • Place a rack in middle of oven; preheat to 450°. Smear butter all over outside of turkey. Arrange turkey wings (if using), neck, and giblets, then onions, celery, and garlic around turkey and pour in wine. Roast on center rack until skin is golden all over, 25–35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300° and continue to roast turkey, rotating 180° halfway through, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of breast registers 150° (temperature will rise as the bird rests), 1½–2 hours. Carefully transfer turkey to a cutting board and tent with foil.

  • Increase oven temperature to 450°. Push vegetables, neck, giblets, and wings (if using) into center of roasting pan and sprinkle flour over. Roast until flour is very lightly browned in a few spots, 12–15 minutes. Scrape contents of roasting pan into a large saucepan. Add thyme and broth. Bring to a gentle boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until reduced by nearly half and gravy is thick enough to coat a spoon, 25–30 minutes. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium saucepan; discard solids. Stir in soy sauce; season with more salt if needed. Bring to a gentle simmer over low heat while you carve the turkey. Thin with a bit more stock if needed.

Nutritional Content

Calories (kcal) 760 Fat (g) 28 Saturated Fat (g) 11 Cholesterol (mg) 375 Carbohydrates (g) 12 Dietary Fiber (g) 1 Total Sugars (g) 3 Protein (g) 98 Sodium (mg) 1910Reviews SectionThis recipe is good and the gravy is easy to make and tasty but the cook times are way off. I mean about an hour off. My oven is accurate and I was shocked that this info would come from such a reputable source. Very inconvenient.AnonymousColorado 11/23/17

5 Ways to Cook Your Thanksgiving Turkey

Thanksgiving is fast approaching and Mobile Meat and Seafood has a few mouth-watering turkey recipes for this holiday season.

The perfect recipe starts with the turkey, and MM&S can deliver fresh all natural antibiotic and hormone-free turkeys direct to your door this Thanksgiving season. Our customers rave about the flavor and tenderness of our birds and know they are serving their family and guests the healthiest bird as well. So, order your perfect turkey from MM&S, and try out one of these recipes to kick Thanksgiving up a notch.


Easy Roast Turkey with No-Roux Gravy - Recipes

How to carve a turkey

Notes

Estimated Nutrition

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22 Comments

Love this way of cooking turkey! Saves so much time!! Also your sparkly nails are on point

Do you brine the turkey at all before the day you plan to roast it?

hi bernadette,
no brining needed because the skin helps flavor as it drips down, but you could do a brine, if that’s what you usually do!


I spatchcocked a 12 lb.turkey last week – my first time! I’ve done chicken before, so I had the idea. That turkey was the best ever. Simple, under the skin seasoning, brushed the skin with butter. Oh, My! Done in 75 minutes. Whats not to love?

right?! spatachcocking is the BEST!


I love a good spatchcock (LOL!!) but really, SUCH a good way to roast things – I am guessing it’s never come into major mainstream play because everyone bows down to the big ass browned turkey sitting like a glistening rump on a platter?? Spatchcock would also be a HILARIOUS band name, made up of a food bloggers … Steph this looks delicious!! Please invite me over for turkey rice (or chicken rice!!) XO

mmmmmmmm turkey rice party.

Bought an 18 lb turkey, but sounds like you don’t recommend this method for big one?

i definitely think it would work well with a larger turkey but because i haven’t done this recipe with one, i can’t recommend it. but, if you do try it, start checking the turkey at the 1.5 hour mark. it will most likely take longer – as long as you have an instant read thermometer and you get the breast to 150°F and the thighs to 165°F, you should be good.

Bigger the bird the bigger the pan needs to be to lay flat. And yes cook time will increase some. I always spatchcock (sometimes debone). Only way to cook a turkey in my opinion.

Such a beautiful dish to make in such a low amount of time! Looks amazing!

hi!
i usually make a variation on the stuffing that i have in this post!

Ooh, Can’t wait till xmas so I can make this.looks scrumptious.

Wish xmas was here already , been waiting to make this for ages. Looks scrumptious

I’m definitely going to try this, but what really made me stop to comment is that I’ve never seen such a gorgeous turkey platter!

This is beautiful! I’ve been thinking about trying spatchcocking my bird this year and you’ve sealed the deal for me! Can’t wair!! One question—how much butter do you use in the citrus herb butter? I read over it twice and didn’t see butter as an ingredient?
Happy turkey day to you & yours!!

oops, it’s a 1/4 cup! i’ll change the recipe!


This year I made the turkey this way. Sooo good. The surprise ….the best breast meat I’ve ever tasted in 60 yrs of cooking turkey. 90 minute cooking time. Great for our smaller number at the table. .

awesome! yay for spatchcocking and for the best breast! :)


I have done chickens many times (to roast them on our grill) but had never spatchcocked a turkey until this year. We had a 17# turkey and it was amazing! Took about 2 hours to reach perfection…skin crispy and all sections of meat were juicy and tender. Only way I will roast turkey from now on.

yay! so happy that your thanksgiving was wonderful :)

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i am a food blog is an award winning food blog that’s been around since 2010 featuring hundreds of easy, fun, and delicious modern Asian- and globally-inspired recipes that celebrate the joy of home cooking. Our tips and tricks will have you cooking like a pro in no time. Pull up a chair and stick around for awhile, let’s be friends and eat together!

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Classic cheese sauce begins with bຜhamel — a simple white sauce made of butter, flour, milk, and a few seasonings. Cheese is then added to the white sauce to create cheese sauce (called a Mornay sauce in French cuisine). Here are the three basic steps to make cheese sauce:

  1. Butter and flour are cooked together to make a paste called a roux.
  2. Milk and seasonings are added to the roux to make a white sauce.
  3. Cheese is added to the white sauce to make cheese sauce.

It&aposs that simple, but the trick is knowing how to make the roux, how to add the milk without creating lumps, and how to add the cheese so the sauce turns out smooth and not grainy.

Step One: Make the Roux

  1. Measure out equal amounts of butter and flour. As a general rule, you&aposll use 2 tablespoons butter and 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour for every 1 cup of milk.
  2. Dice the butter into small cubes and melt it in a saucepan over low heat. Once the butter is melted, begin whisking in the flour.
  3. When all the flour is incorporated, continue stirring and cooking for a few minutes to activate the starch granules. This is what will thicken the sauce. If you&aposre making a white or light-colored cheese sauce, cook the roux for about 3 to 5 minutes over low heat so the mixture stays light in color and doesn&apost brown. The roux is ready when it smells slightly nutty and loses any raw flour taste.

Step Two: Add Milk and Seasonings

  1. Next comes the milk. If the roux is hot, the milk should be cool, but if the roux is cool, the milk should be hot. When you combine the ingredients at different temperatures, they heat up at a moderate rate — not too fast, and not too slow — creating a velvety-smooth sauce.
  2. Pour in the milk gradually while whisking the roux until the mixture is smooth, then add seasonings if you wish. Traditional seasonings for bຜhamel are diced or grated onion, a bay leaf, a couple cloves, and a pinch of nutmeg.
  3. Simmer the sauce until it gets to the consistency you want, then strain out any seasonings. If you&aposre in a hurry, you can simmer the sauce over high heat, but you&aposll want to keep whisking to prevent it from burning.

Step Three: Add Cheese

  1. Remove the pan from the heat and stir in the grated cheese a handful at a time. If the cheese doesn&apost seem to be melting, return the pan to very low heat, but do not let it come to a boil or your sauce will be grainy.
  2. A note about cheese: Pre-shredded cheese is coated to prevent the shreds from sticking together in the package and can cause your cheese sauce to be grainy instead of smooth. It&aposs best to grate your own cheese to make cheese sauce.

You can create an endless variety of cheese sauces by varying the kind of cheese you use, mixing in different herbs, spices, and vegetables, and using milk, half and half, or heavy cream to alter the level of richness in the sauce.

Keep these tips in mind when cooking with cheese:

  • Shred, crumble, or finely dice the cheese before heating to ensure quick, smooth melting. The colder the cheese is, the easier it will be to cut.
  • The less you heat cheese, the better. When making soup, sauce, or fondue, add the cheese last then heat it only as long as it takes to melt. If it gets too hot it will get tough. Often, you can remove the pan from the burner the residual heat will melt the cheese.
  • Allow the shredded cheese to come to room temperature before adding it to a hot mixture.
  • Starch (such as all-purpose flour, cornstarch, or potato flour) will keep the cheese from curdling. If using all-purpose flour, add it to the mixture before the cheese it needs to be cooked for a few minutes to remove the starchy taste.
  • Adding an acidic ingredient such as wine or lemon juice will help prevent the cheese from becoming stringy. This is why most cheese fondue recipes have a base of white wine. Simply sprinkle some lemon juice over the shredded cheese before heating it.
  • Reduced-fat cheeses melt differently than regular full-fat cheeses. Reduced fat cheese will take longer to melt and will not have the same velvety consistency in the sauce. Be sure to shred reduced-fat cheese very finely, and allow it to melt over very low heat while stirring constantly.

How to Make Cheese Sauce for Vegetables

See how to make this simple, creamy Cheese Sauce for Broccoli and Cauliflower. You&aposll start with a quick roux, then whisk in milk and sharp or white Cheddar cheese.


Ways to use a Roux

We tend to think of a roux in terms of thickening a gravy, but there are lots of other uses for it. Try one of these:

  • Use the roux to make a gumbo
  • Gratin dishes like scalloped potatoes often start with a roux
  • Use a dark roux to make an easy beef stroganoff recipe.
  • Make a roux to thicken your macaroni and cheese recipe
  • Use a roux to make a bechamel sauce.
  • Make a dark roux to thicken gravy for a pot roast.
  • Thicken a soup or chowder with a homemade roux.
  • Use a roux to make an easy Alfredo sauce for pasta.
  • Make a white sauce for Chicken pot pie that starts with a roux.

Even though the word roux comes from French cuisine, the technique is really very simple. You need just four things:

The type of roux that you end up with depends mainly on your last item &ndash Time! The longer you cook and stir, the deeper the color and flavor.

What type of roux do you enjoy making?


How to Avoid the Lumps in Your Turkey Gravy

The trick to avoiding lumps is to cook together equal parts of flour with a fat, such as clarified butter, vegetable oil or grease. This mixture is known as a roux and serves as a thickener for gravy. As a general rule of thumb, a ½ cup of roux will thicken 4 cups of gravy.

Any type of liquid can be added to a roux to make gravy, including the broth or drippings from beef, pork, or chicken. If you&aposre roasting a turkey, use the drippings from the roasting pan and turkey broth to make the gravy. Got gravy problems? For more gravy-making tips, check out how to make your gravy great.

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All of my recipes are written to work in ANY brand of electric pressure cooker, including

    (all models Duo, Ultra, Max, Nova, Evo, etc.)
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>> That&rsquos it! You&rsquove completed the Getting Started Guide!

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Before long you&rsquoll be wondering how you ever cooked without your pressure cooker, and whipping up more sophisticated desserts like my Nutella Rolo Cheesecake.


RECIPE PREPARATION:

Mix brown sugar, spices, pepper, and 3 Tbsp. or 4 ½ tsp. salt in a small bowl to combine sprinkle all over surface and inside cavity of turkey. Place turkey on a V-shape roasting rack set inside a large roasting pan (if using a disposable pan, place it on a rimmed baking sheet). Chill, uncovered, at least 8 hours and up to 1 day.

Let sit at room temperature 1½–2 hours.

Place a rack in middle of oven preheat to 450°. Smear butter all over outside of turkey. Arrange turkey wings (if using), neck, and giblets, then onions, celery, and garlic around turkey and pour in wine. Roast on center rack until skin is golden all over, 25–35 minutes. Reduce oven temperature to 300° and continue to roast turkey, rotating 180° halfway through, until an instant-read thermometer inserted into the thickest part of breast registers 150° (temperature will rise as the bird rests), 1½–2 hours. Carefully transfer turkey to a cutting board and tent with foil.

Increase oven temperature to 450°. Push vegetables, neck, giblets, and wings (if using) into center of roasting pan and sprinkle flour over. Roast until flour is very lightly browned in a few spots, 12–15 minutes. Scrape contents of roasting pan into a large saucepan. Add thyme and broth. Bring to a gentle boil and cook, stirring occasionally, until reduced by nearly half and gravy is thick enough to coat a spoon, 25–30 minutes. Strain mixture through a fine-mesh sieve into a medium saucepan discard solids. Stir in soy sauce season with more salt if needed. Bring to a gentle simmer over low heat while you carve the turkey. Thin with a bit more stock if needed.


Terms To Know About Your Instant Pot

There are many different models of Instant Pots and some buttons may be marked a bit differently.

  • Steam Release Handle = the moveable vent on top of the lid.
  • Sealing = the process of putting the lid on, locking it, and switching the steam release handle to &ldquosealing&rdquo.
  • Venting = the process of switching the steam release handle to &ldquoventing&rdquo.
  • Float Valve = the pin (in some cases it is red) on the lid that indicates if the pot is at pressure or depressurized. Up=pressurized, down = no longer pressurized and safe to open. This valve is hot so don&rsquot touch it when the pot is in use.
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  • Display functions = this is the digital screen that will let you know what is happening with your Instant Pot
    • ON = the Instant Pot is coming up to pressure. This can take only a few minutes or up to 30 depending on what you are cooking.
    • Numbers = Once the Instant Pot is up to pressure it will start counting DOWN the cook time you had entered in. Ex: you set it for 20 minutes and the display now shows &ldquo12&rdquo. That means there are 12 minutes left for the cooking process.
    • OFF = the cooking process has ended (this will happen at the same time as multiple beeps). It will then start to count UP time showing how many minutes it has been since the cooking has finished. This helps you keep track of how long you want the &ldquoKeep Warm&rdquo function to be used. If you don&rsquot want to use it, just press &ldquoKeep Warm/Off&rdquo again, or unplug.

    Ready to get started? Let&rsquos do this!


    Decadent Breakfasts & Laptop Lunches

    I woke up Saturday morning feeling as one feels the morning after one’s friends have come into town and bought one shots. On a scale of 0 = no hangover to 10 = the worst one I’ve ever had, I was somewhere around a 3, which is really not so bad. Anywho, the very first thing I thought when I woke up was that I wanted a “decadent” breakfast. Decadent is not a word I use, nor an adjective I wish to describe my life (which it certainly does not), but apparently it was a breakfast I wanted. So I made Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Oat Bran. BF was borrowing my camera to craigslist some furniture, so you get a cell phone shot that is unworthy of the true deliciousness.

    I like to plop pb on my oat bran right when it’s done cooking, that way when you stir it in it melts a little. Some bites are more pb than anything else, and obviously, those are the best bites. I left the banana chunky and used crunchy pb in this cause I like the texture, but mashed banana and smooth pb would be really good too. This decadent breakfast is actually really good for you!

    Chocolate Peanut Butter Banana Oat Bran

    1/4 c oat bran
    1/2 c rice/almond/soy milk
    1/4 c water
    banana, chopped
    handful chocolate chips
    pinch of salt
    1-2 Tbs peanut butter

    1. Combine oatbran, milk and water in a microwaveable bowl. Microwave 1 minute.
    2. Stir in the banana, reserving some for garnish. Microwave another minute.
    3. Stir in the chocolate chips and salt microwave another minute.
    4. Stir again, and if a thicker consistency is desired microwave one more minute.
    5. Put the pb on top, and garnish with banana and extra chocolate chips. Stir before eating.

    Sunday morning I woke up with a hearty hunger. I had been contemplating biscuits and gravy since I had biscuits to use up in the freezer. I also though I had half a package of Morningstar chick’n strips, so I was thinking white peppery chick’n gravy. Turns out they were steak strips, and so I made steak gravy.

    It doesn’t make for the prettiest picture, but the gravy was so good! I used the Easy Gravy recipe from Hot Damn & Hell Yeah as a reference. I subbed rice milk for some of the water, added a dash of vegan Worcestershire sauce, used copious amounts of salt and black pepper, and threw in chopped “steak” at the end. My singular complaint is that it took FOREVER for the gravy to cook down. Like, over an hour. Maybe my roux wasn’t as roux-ish as it was supposed to be, I’m no roux expert. Even with the wait, this meal was well worth it, especially to use up more bits from the freezer.

    I’m starting to freak out a bit about moving. NEXT WEEK. Until now it was some thing in the future that I had plenty of time to plan for. Now it’s next week. I had a really hard time falling asleep last night. Partly because we watched the third Lord Of The Rings movie (which was really awesome, but far too action packed for just-before-bedtime), and partly because my mind started obsessing over all the stuff that’s still in my apartment that I can’t take with me. It’s okay though, there are some people coming by tonight to hopefully by furniture, and I’ve set Friday as the date to cart off all the smaller stuff to Salvation Army. Until I move it will continue to be simple eats for me, such as dinner from Saturday night.

    There was a free preview of some MLB package going on, so we watched baseball all day and grilled lunch and dinner. Lunch was an uneventful veggie burger. Dinner was a prepackaged herbed tofu steak with mushrooms, grilled asparagus, a hedgehog potato (stuffed with minced garlic, salt and pepper – first saw the idea here), and grilled zucchini with red onion leftover from lunch. The grilling gods were not smiling upon us, I think it took over two hours to complete this meal. So I guess it wasn’t really that simple. It was mostly due to the Publix Greenwise charcoal we tried to use – It would blaze for 15 minutes or so, then completely die. We had to finish the potatoes in the oven.

    Since there’s been so much on my mind I haven’t been keeping up with laptop lunches. I still take a lunch every day, but more often I have been throwing stuff in tupperware instead of taking the time to arrange it. Here are a few from last week.

    7-15 chickpea cutlet & tomato parmesan, cherry tomatoes, spaghetti marinara w/
    almond parmesan, roasted green beans, peach slices, blackberries

    7-16 lima & edamame succotash, onion rings, ketchup, fig bar, blueberry muffin

    7-17 bulgur pilaf, cucumber tomato salad, spaghetti marinara w/
    almond parmesan, gherkins, dried apples & pineapple