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Potato Latkes

Potato Latkes


Ingredients

  • 6 large potatoes, peeled (about 2 1/2 lbs.)
  • 1 small onion, finely chopped
  • 2 eggs, lightly beaten
  • 3 Tablespoons flour
  • 2 Teaspoons Lawry's® Seasoned Salt
  • 1/2 Teaspoon Lawry's® Garlic Pepper
  • 1/2 Cup vegetable oil, for frying

Directions

Shred potatoes. Squeeze dry in a large clean kitchen towel and place in a large bowl.

Add onion, eggs, flour, seasoned salt and garlic pepper; mix well.

Heat oil in large nonstick skillet on medium-high heat.

Drop potato mixture, several heaping tablespoonfuls at a time, into skillet. Flatten slightly with back of spoon.

Cook 3 to 4 minutes or until golden brown, turning once.

Drain on paper towels. Keep warm.

Repeat with remaining potato mixture, adding additional oil if needed.

Serve with sour cream seasoned with additional garlic pepper and chopped chives, or serve with applesauce or apricot preserves.

Nutritional Facts

Servings8

Calories Per Serving236

Folate equivalent (total)25µg6%


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.


Potato Latkes Recipe

This recipe, from Atlanta chef Todd Ginsberg, is pure latke perfection. Ginsberg prefers to cook his latkes (potato pancakes) on a griddle rather than deep-frying them. This results in a lighter, less greasy latke that also reheats well&mdashso you can make a big batch in advance. These latkes fry up crisp with frizzled, lacy edges. The key, Ginsberg says, is having enough clarified butter in the pan at all times. &ldquoIf you do not hear sizzling, there&rsquos not enough fat. And don&rsquot flip or touch the latkes until you see a golden color creeping up the sides,&rdquo he advises. Ginsberg prefers frying latkes in clarified butter, but this recipe will work just as well with canola or vegetable oil. Regardless how you like to top your latkes, this 30-minute recipe might be your new favorite. With a high yield and short timeframe, this latke recipe is the one for you if you&rsquore hosting a crowd for Hanukkah. If you&rsquore not serving immediately or make multiple batches for seconds (and thirds), our Test Kitchen recommends draining your latkes on a paper-towel lined baking sheet for a few seconds before transferring them to a wire rack on a rimmed baking sheet. To keep them hot and crispy without getting soggy, place them in a 250˚ oven.